To tell the truth

This child of mine
with dramatic flair
who thinks in extremes
and speaks with thespian panache
is weird.
And she is okay with that.

She’s not unlike me.
The sign a family member often used is
two fingers opening and closing
like scissors.
It is a silent representation
of the phrase
“cut from the same cloth.”
she and i.joyful

When I was young,
my father used to ask,
“Why can’t you be like everybody else?”
As a teen, it made me sad …
I was different
and I loved it.
Was it wrong to be different?
Was it bad to feel like an original and behave accordingly?
I liked who I was, but couldn’t understand why someone who loved me
didn’t like me being an original.
All teens have struggles.  This was mine.
Now, I know that it was just that my dad didn’t quite understand me…..
because I was different.
We all struggle with understanding
that which is not like ourselves.

But, me? I understand my girl.

She makes unusual noises.
Her favorite odd noise
is not unlike what movie creators
like to imagine a
pterodactyl might sound.

She says things that are bold and blunt and leave one reeling, and she dresses unique. The other day at the pool, I overheard a little boy, brother to a friend, say, “You’re weird!!”  I cringed. Didn’t that hurt her feelings??

Later that night, I talked to her about the comment.  Her reply?
“Mom, ya know what I say when people say that to me?  I tell them, ‘Wouldn’t it be boring place if everybody was the same?  God made us all different for a reason.  You say I’m weird, but that just means that I’m not like you.  It makes for a more interesting world.'”

Stunned.

Speechless.

I was.

And so we’re struggling with the line between
talking, creating, speaking with dramatic flair for emphasis
and exaggeration and outright lying.

The problem here:  I don’t know where the line is drawn
when we move from one
into another.

When she was little, I made a little magnet for the fridge that said,
“Joy’s verse:  God hates lying lips,
but delights in those who tell the truth.  Proverbs 12:22”

Because we were already struggling when she began piecing together sentences before age three.  She signed well as a baby and spoke easily and early, forming sentences quickly after beginning to speak. Yes, from the start, I’ve wondered, “Is she lying or embellishing?”The exaggeration of the moment

Here is a fine example.  When she scrapped her ankle, she proclaimed “I’m bleeding to death.”  Do you see that scab?  Does that look like a life threatening injury to you?  When I tried to talk to her about exaggeration, she wouldn’t budge.  Nope.  She was bleeding “to death.”

And so I worry about her in school.  Will she easily find friends?
Probably … my worry is more a reflection of how I feel about my own relationships
than it is about what will be the reality for her life
simply because she’s much more comfortable with herself
than I have ever been.

Yet, I pray.  I’m praying that God will teach her to use her drama to draw others to her and Himself.  Praying that her words would have impact in a way that is positive.  Praying that she edifies and builds people up and through friendship,  heals broken hearts, rather than crushing spirits. Praying that her uniqueness draws people near, rather than pushes them away.

Yes, I’m praying that she will learn to use
her dramatic flair
and creative words
to tell the truth
and to encourage.
Because,
unlike my worry ….
that she would be hurt
if others thought she was weird,
rather the contrary is true.
It appears that
self-esteem
certainly is not an issue.

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3 thoughts on “To tell the truth

  1. I have a unique 17 year old. He loves the Lord.Thinks deeply. Laughs loudly and dresses like a Rocker.
    The Lord will make his way.

    Like

  2. And I trust the same for my Joy 🙂

    If He created them,
    with their intricacies,
    I know He can use those
    eccentric ways to bless others.
    And I will continue to pray for her ..
    and yours : )

    Like

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